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20131202
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
reagan's -- the anc because we called ate communist organization. i think the willingness to look at south africa beyond cold arrest terms even when the cold war was raging in the neigh years. >> when you talked to nelson mandela, did you find that he -- had he forgiven the west for, you know, having mostly for the most part sided against the anc? >> i think in my conversations with him, he forgive the west, yes, and he realized that a huge amount of learnings we can pick up from western leaders and in deed we did pick up a huge amount of learnings. i think for example, you remember quite well when he came out he emphasized a question that ultimately these enterprises are going to be nationalized and that was the policy of the anc and so forth and so on. i think it was because of his contacts with major western leaders that he was able to motivate that viewpoint. i'm not trying to suggest that mandela as some people like to suggest simply loving -- i think he succumbed to reason and that reason came from his peers largely in the west. >> peter, what do you think explains the dropo
. there were strong strands within the anc, within south africa, that were centered on black consciousness. he was intent on having an election with mandate that reduced their role. he focused on, as you know, the pan african congress, polling 2% or 3% of the poll. historically, they played a big role in africa and the liberation struggle. he wanted to use the election to send a message this would be an inclusive country. >> and jendayi frazer. talking about the relationship with people he didn't necessarily get along with. we know f.w. de klerk. they shared a nobel peace prize. everyone though they didn't share much of a relationship. nelson mandela, a fierce critic of president bush on the war in iraq and the invasion of iraq. he was determined to try to maintain something of a personal relationship there. >> actually, president mandela, as fierce a critic as he was to the war in iraq supported the war in afghanistan. if you recall, in 2001 when he first met president george w. bush as the president in the oval office, he came out and forcefully endorsed america going into afghanistan. just
escape? >> not in our time, ever. but very good plans. >> b wing is where all the key anc prisoners were held. so the man was here in this room. this room was his cell. >> from 1964 up until 1979, they were given this. >> two meters by two meters, the mat on the floor, no bed until his final years, a bucket and a precious window to the outside world. my guide has often gazed from mandela's window before. but today, he becomes overwhelmed by tears. >> an incredible life. >> yes. >> surviving this was critical. >> yes. >> and they tried everything to humiliate him? >> all the things. they did everything. trying to break him down. they even use his family. >> when he looked out of his window, mandela's solace was his small garden along the prison wall. he planted this tree and sat beneath the vine he nurtured from the courtyard grid. on his last year on robben island, mandela was allowed to work here cape town, tantalizingly close. surviving robben island, to emerge preaching both hope and forgiveness, utterly central to mandela's position here and across the world. they are bound up in tha
covering up some of the realities of how individuals regarded both the anc and more specifically, nelson mandela in all these eulogies? >> i think no doubt we are. nelson mandela's spiritual giant, political revolutionary, we are witnessing the santa clausification of nelson mandel. a we turned the revolutionary into an old man with a toy bag. no longer really full of the fire. we can at 95, brother nelson mandela was still full of fire. he had that militant tenderness and sub versive sweetness and radical gentleness, tied to refusing to be fearful or intimidated in the face of a vicious white supremacist apartheid regime. >> ted cruz, the senator from texas, paid respect on facebook. he said nelson mandela will live in history for defenders of liberty around the globe. someone said he was a murderer and a communist. another one said sad to see you feel this way. he was a terrorist. i guess you have only seen the hollywood movies. getting away from what the comment section of the internet generally is, let's talk about some of these specific charges. communist, terrorist. where do they c
trying to convince people that the anc was a communist organization and trying to improve the appearance of south africa in the eyes of the west. they -- we have found this quote from a senior south african military intelligence person who said, quote, our strategy was to paint the anc as communist surrogates, the more we could present ourselves as anti-communists, the more people looked at us with respect. people you could have hardly believed cooperated with us politically when it came to the soviets. i mean, april, i was able to find that in like five minutes online. >> yeah. well, i want to put this in perspective. i talked to former president bill clinton yesterday. did an interview with him and he said, you know, with this issue about nelson mandela and his friendships and those who supported him, like gadhafi and ka castro, he said we don't look like ourselves view themselves. when we went on the tour, the historic africa tour with bill clinton in the second term and joburg, nelson mandela was asked a question about the friendships and nelson mandela himself said, look, if you don
amazing story that he told me was on the night before they left prison calling all the anc prisoners together and saying, yes, they would be justified in acts of revenge, retaliation and retribution, but there could never then be a strong, successful, multiracial society, and that was his second great achievement, to achieve change through reconciliation. but, you know, there was a didder achievement, refusing to rest or relax when he gave up the presidency. he had great achievement to his name. he himself wrote that in the first part of his life he had climbed one great mountain to end apartheid, but now in his later life he wanted to climb another great mountain, to rid the world of poverty and especially the outrage of child poverty. and i need speak of only what i saw in the times that i worked with him, how quietly and without fanfare he went about his work. 2005 i flew to south africa to meet nelson mandela to persuade him to come to london so that he could then persuade the finance ministers of the need for debt relief to relieve poverty, and this he did. and then in 2006 with
that traditional tribal situation in south africa with the revolutionary moment of the anc and with white south africans. that was another amazing triumph of his. >> how perfectly appropriate that his homecoming will be in that place that he found so tranquil and peaceful. i want to talk to you about his time in prison. did you get a sense there was a defining moment that that shift happened for him? in prison, men are broken. he wasn't broken. >> yes. whatever the psychologists said, the same fire that melts the butter hardens the egg. it hardened him, it didn't melt him. one of the things about him, the man who went to prison was a different man that came out. >> he was hot headed. >> hot headed, tempestuous. pricen w prison was the crucible that hardened him. one day he said to me, i came out mature. very rare, a mature man. >> i told you, he said it to more than just you, why he is adamant that i am not a saint. he said that often. >> i think there's a lesson for all of us. he wasn't a saint. what he was was -- and he was proud to call himself this -- he was a politician, a politician that
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)